Survey: Indian parents spend an average of INR 32,000 annually on their children’s education

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A study was conducted on the overall spending on a child’s schooling and education in India among those in affordable private and government schools. This was done by Schoolnet, an EdTech service provider that announced the findings of its survey titled, “Understanding Indian School Education Spends Landscape” in collaboration with PGA Labs

The survey found that parents in India spend an average of INR 32,000, split as:

Tier I

INR 43,000

Tier II

INR 33,000

Tier III

INR 34,000

Tier IV

INR 29,000

Further findings revealed that 7 per cent of families in Tier 1 cities spend under INR 10,000 on their child’s schooling, as compared to 18 per cent of parents in Tier 4 cities in the country. The data shows large gaps exist in education spending across India, owing to factors such as expensive options for supplementary education, varying availability of resources, and levels of education of the parents. As we move from Tier I to Tier IV, the average spending on education reduces, which influences the equitable access to education in the country.

In tandem with school education, after-school education provides students with added academic advantages. At the same time, various factors such as tuition fees, laptops, textbooks and even subscriptions to online educational applications form important components of its accessibility and delivery. As per the study, on average, Indian families spend INR 16,000 annually on after-school education including personal tutors, tuition classes, and coaching classes.

Tier I

INR 19,000

Tier II

INR 18,000

Tier III

INR 14,000

Tier IV

INR 14,000

Overall, 32 per cent of families in Tier 1 cities spent less than INR 10,000 on after-school services, as compared to 41% of parents in Tier 4 regions.

About the Study:  It was a cross-sectional survey of 1,174 parents across 91 cities (Tiers I, II, III, and IV) in India. Conducted between November 2021 and February 2022, it focused on the educational spending and preferences for the youngest child (Grades 3-12). The annual household income was a key screening criterion – the focus was on families in the middle and bottom of the economic pyramid.

Also Read: This Mumbai-Based Education Institute Goes Global To Provide Transformative Training



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